Author: Sad Isn't Bad

Sad Isn’t Bad Featured on Keloland Living

In October, our Executive Director, Jill Stoebner, was invited to be interviewed on Keloland Living. In her conversation with Gary Weckwerth, Stoebner highlighted how we serve the Sioux Falls community, how we got started, and how the conversation between caregivers and children after the death of a loved one can happen. Watch the interview here.

Sad Isn’t Bad Interview on Keloland Living Video

 

What Do We Do at Sad Isn’t Bad?

What Do We Do at Sad Isn’t Bad?

The saying “Sad isn’t bad” may seem straightforward, but the death of a loved one often leaves us feeling confused and alone.

Our name serves as a gentle reminder that it’s okay to feel sad after the death of a loved one.

How do we do that?

The grief we feel after the death of a loved one can make us feel alone, upset, and angry, and it can be a confusing and scary time for both children and their families, as each person processes grief differently.

At Sad Isn’t Bad, we provide a safe, supportive place for children and their parents or caregivers to communicate the emotions they feel after a loved one’s death.

We aim to help children identify and express their feelings in a healthy way, foster open communication within families, and provide tools for individuals to continue on their journey with grief.

These may seem like fuzzy objectives, especially as life without a loved one leaves us confused and in pain, but at Sad Isn’t Bad we remove some of the barriers to this process in what we call “sessions.”

A session consists of four meetings, each with two main parts:

  1. Meals. We provide families with a meal to share together. It’s an informal time where you can connect with your family members, other families attending the session, and the facilitators to break the ice.
  2. Small-group discussions. We then break out into small groups by age: elementary school children, middle schoolers/high schoolers, and adults. Each group is led by a professional facilitator who prompts discussion and encourages each person to talk about their experiences with grief when they’re comfortable doing so. Being surrounded by peers allows each person to feel more accepted about the emotions they’re feeling.

We know life after the death of a loved one is difficult, and we’re here to make it easier for families to communicate their feelings in an honest and productive way.

Why are we called “Sad Isn’t Bad?”

Why are we called “Sad Isn’t Bad?”

When you scroll past our name for the first time, it may seem like just a nice maxim, but, after looking again, you realize our organization’s name is actually a statement: “Sad Isn’t Bad.”

I’m sure you’re thinking, “What the heck; that’s an odd thing to call an organization,” but hear us out, we call ourselves Sad Isn’t Bad for good reason.

In today’s society, there’s a big emphasis on being happy. A quick search of, “how to be happy,” brings up almost four billion results on the Internet. Across all forms of media, Americans see smiling faces: TV news anchors, YouTubers, Instagram influencers, and our friends as they post life highlights on social media. The pursuit of happiness is everywhere.

When we don’t feel as happy as the world around us appears to be, all of this focus on being happy can leave us feeling isolated. Often times, it feels like we’re the only ones going through the challenges life throws at us, especially when tragedy strikes.

After the death of a loved one it can be hard to talk about. That’s why we’re here.

One of the most stressful and confusing challenges to go through is a death of a loved one. Questions flood your mind: Why did this happen to me? Will this ever hurt less? Why am I so sad? These questions don’t have easy answers. You may feel like you don’t have someone to talk to or think bringing it up to your family may only make it worse.

We chose the name Sad Isn’t Bad to be a gentle reminder that it’s okay to feel sad after a death of a loved one. It’s confusing. It’s painful. It’s sad. After the death of a loved one it can be hard to talk about. That’s why we’re here.

Sad Isn’t Bad supports kids and their families as they grieve the death of a loved one. At Sad Isn’t Bad, professional counselors lead group sessions for children, adolescents, and adults to help families identify and express their feelings in a healthy way, foster open family communication, and provide tools to help individuals continue on their grief journey.