Why are we called “Sad Isn’t Bad?”

Why are we called “Sad Isn’t Bad?”

When you scroll past our name for the first time, it may seem like just a nice maxim, but, after looking again, you realize our organization’s name is actually a statement: “Sad Isn’t Bad.”

I’m sure you’re thinking, “What the heck; that’s an odd thing to call an organization,” but hear us out, we call ourselves Sad Isn’t Bad for good reason.

In today’s society, there’s a big emphasis on being happy. A quick search of, “how to be happy,” brings up almost four billion results on the Internet. Across all forms of media, Americans see smiling faces: TV news anchors, YouTubers, Instagram influencers, and our friends as they post life highlights on social media. The pursuit of happiness is everywhere.

When we don’t feel as happy as the world around us appears to be, all of this focus on being happy can leave us feeling isolated. Often times, it feels like we’re the only ones going through the challenges life throws at us, especially when tragedy strikes.

After the death of a loved one it can be hard to talk about. That’s why we’re here.

One of the most stressful and confusing challenges to go through is a death of a loved one. Questions flood your mind: Why did this happen to me? Will this ever hurt less? Why am I so sad? These questions don’t have easy answers. You may feel like you don’t have someone to talk to or think bringing it up to your family may only make it worse.

We chose the name Sad Isn’t Bad to be a gentle reminder that it’s okay to feel sad after a death of a loved one. It’s confusing. It’s painful. It’s sad. After the death of a loved one it can be hard to talk about. That’s why we’re here.

Sad Isn’t Bad supports kids and their families as they grieve the death of a loved one. At Sad Isn’t Bad, professional counselors lead group sessions for children, adolescents, and adults to help families identify and express their feelings in a healthy way, foster open family communication, and provide tools to help individuals continue on their grief journey.

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